A good high blood pressure food diet

By | November 16, 2020

a good high blood pressure food diet

By making these 10 lifestyle changes, you can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure, you might be worried about taking medication to bring your numbers down. Lifestyle plays an important role in treating your high blood pressure. If you successfully control your blood pressure with a healthy lifestyle, you might avoid, delay or reduce the need for medication. Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep sleep apnea, which further raises your blood pressure. Weight loss is one of the most effective lifestyle changes for controlling blood pressure. Losing even a small amount of weight if you’re overweight or obese can help reduce your blood pressure. In general, you may reduce your blood pressure by about 1 millimeter of mercury mm Hg with each kilogram about 2.

Regular salad dressings. When buying pre-packaged pomegranate juice, check to ensure that there is no added sugar. Regular visits with your doctor are also key to controlling your blood pressure. Nonpharmacologic prevention and treatment of hypertension.

Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against blood vessel walls. The heart pumps blood into the arteries blood vessels which carry the blood throughout the body. High blood pressure, also called hypertension, means the pressure in your arteries is above the normal range. In most cases, no one knows what causes high blood pressure. What you eat can affect your blood pressure. Unsalted seeds pumpkin, squash, sunflower and unsalted nuts are mineral-rich foods that lower blood pressure. Salt is mostly sodium, a mineral that occurs naturally in foods. Sodium is the substance that may cause your blood pressure to increase. Other forms of sodium are also present in food. MSG monosodium glutamate is another example of a sodium added to food common in Chinese food. When you eat too much salt, which contains sodium, your body holds extra water to “wash” the salt from your body.

Fiddling with diet to control cholesterol makes perfect sense. After all, some of the cholesterol that ends up in arteries starts out in food. Changing your diet to control blood pressure doesn’t seem quite so straightforward. Yet food can have a direct and sometimes dramatic effect on blood pressure. Salt certainly plays a role. But there is far more to a blood pressure—friendly diet than minimizing salt intake. Fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods, beans, nuts, whole-grain carbohydrates, and unsaturated fats also have healthful effects on blood pressure. There isn’t a single “magic” food in this list. Instead, it’s the foundation for an all-around healthful eating strategy that is good for blood pressure and so much more.

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